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Executives for Solutions

Executives for Solutions is a powerful group of executives committed to saving lives and improving their company's bottom line. CEOs and executives from top companies are uniting to change the course of cancer and catastrophic illness to leverage the collective knowledge, power, and resources of Survivor Wellness.

In recognition of National Cancer Control Month, every April the Executives for Solutions program hosts the Survivor Wellness Challenge. Together, chapter members will step together during this workday step-tracking event to encourage their colleagues, friends, and community to get active. 

Members bring the passion, expertise and resources needed to prevent, treat and cure this disease, which costs U.S. employers $225.8 billion each year. 

Cancer is everyone's business. The solution is too.

From large corporations to small companies, business leaders understand that cancer is not only a health issue, but also a core business issue: 

  • Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), like cancer, heart disease, and stroke, currently account for 63 percent of deaths (36 million deaths worldwide in 2008).1
  • Over the next 20 years, NCDs will cost the global economy more than $47 trillion, or 75 percent of the global GDP in 2010.2
  • Health related productivity losses cost US employers $225.8 billion annually.3
  • Cancer also has a negative impact on employment patterns with studies estimating 36 percent of employees do not return to work following treatment for cancer.4,5
  • An analysis of health care expenditures indicate that while cancer related disease accounted for 1 percent of a typical employers health care claims, it equated to 10 percent of health care cost.6
  • Cancer is the disease employees fear most and will touch 1 in 4 Americans in their lifetime.7

Making an Impact

The business sector is uniquely positioned to lead the fight against cancer — and to realize a return on their investment. Consider this:

  • More than one-third of all cancers are related to modifiable lifestyle factors that include lack of physical activity, inappropriate dietary practices and tobacco use.8
  • Prevention programs, such as tobacco cessation, as well as regular screenings, are proven methods of decreasing cancer risk among employees, increasing early diagnosis, and increasing overall direct and indirect cost savings.9
  • Some of the biggest successes and most effective treatments –early detection and prevention – are not being used as effectively as they could be.10

By becoming a member of Executives for Solutions, you become part an elite community poised to save the most lives from cancer. Your membership will help your employees, their families and communities save more lives from cancer.

Support from Survivor Wellness

Survivor Wellness provides you the information and resources you need to help your employees and organization:

  • Encourage Prevention: We help you take steps to prevent cancer or find it at its earliest, most treatable stage.
  • Provide Support: We’re here 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year to help people through every step of your disease trauma experience.
  • Foster Innovation: We conduct research and partner with innovative companies and technology to help us better understand, prevent, and find better treatment methods.

 

 

 

1. World Health Organization.Global status report on noncommunicable diseases 2010. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2011.

2. Bloom, D.E., Cafiero, E.T., Jané-Llopis, E., Abrahams-Gessel, S., Bloom, L.R., Fathima, S., Feigl,A.B., Gaziano, T.,  Mowafi, M.,  Pandya, A.,  Prettner, K., Rosenberg, L., Seligman, B., Stein, A.Z., & Weinstein, C. (2011). The Global Economic Burden of Noncommunicable Diseases. Geneva: World Economic Forum.

3. Stewart WF, Ricci JA, Chee E, Morganstein D. Lost productive work time costs from health conditions in the United States: results from the American productivity audit. J Occup Environ Med. 2003;45(12):1234-1246.

4. Bradley CJ, Bednarek HL., Employment patterns of long-term cancer survivors, Psychooncology 2002 May-Jun; 11(3):188-98.

5. Mehnert A., Employment and work-related issues in cancer survivors, Crit Rev OncolHematol. 2011 Feb; 77(2):109-30. Epub 2010 Feb 8.

6. Peyenson, B.,  Cost of Cancer to Employers, Milliman, American Cancer Society, C-Change 2007

7. Peyenson, B.,  Cost of Cancer to Employers, Milliman, American Cancer Society, C-Change 2007

8. Peyenson, B.,  Cost of Cancer to Employers, Milliman, American Cancer Society, C-Change 2007

9. Mehnert A., Employment and work-related issues in cancer survivors, Crit Rev OncolHematol. 2011 Feb; 77(2):109-30. Epub 2010 Feb 8.

10. American Cancer Society.Cancer Facts & Figures 2011. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2011.